Workers’ Compensation FAQs

With a few exceptions, any employee who is injured on the job is entitled to receive Workers’ Compensation benefits.

With a few exceptions, ALL Employers in the State of Georgia are required to carry Workers’ Compensation Insurance for their employees if they “regularly employ three or more person” in their business.

No, but we recommend you consult with an attorney who specializes in Workers’ Compensation benefits to ensure you are receiving ALL the benefits you are entitled to receive under Georgia law. It is important to know that the insurance company representing your employer has a team of lawyers representing the insurance company’s interest. To ensure you are not taken advantage of by the insurance company’s lawyer, we recommend you consult with an experienced attorney who specializes in Workers’ Compensation Law rather than trying to “go it alone.” Our team of attorney’s have a combined experience of over 70 years representing injured workers. Click here or call us at [ocb-phone] to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

We do not charge for your initial consultation.In fact, there is no up-front fee required to hire our firm to represent you for your Workers’ Compensation Claim. We only get paid if are able to obtain benefits for you or if we are able to settle your claim. By statute, the maximum we can receive is 25% of any benefits or settlement. Additionally, the only other fees we charge are for expenses directly related to litigating your case such as fees for obtaining medical records, copying records, taking depositions and a few others which we will explain before you hire our firm.

As a general rule, a Workers’ Compensation claim is an injured worker’s SOLE MEANS for recovery.Generally speaking, you cannot sue your employer or employer’s insurance company for any additional benefits or money on account of a work injury, although there are exceptions if a third party is at fault. If you have questions, please Click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

Usually the answer is “Yes”. Georgia’s Workers’ Compensation system is a “No-Fault” system.Generally speaking, this means that even if the accident was your fault, you are still entitled to receive benefits under the Georgia Workers’ Compensation system. There are important exceptions, please Click hereor call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

Generally speaking, injured workers are entitled to weekly income benefits, medical benefits and potentially permanent partial disability benefits.Each of these are separate benefits defined by statute.Click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney to learn what benefits you are entitled to receive as a result of your work injury.

As a general rule, you are entitled to weekly income benefits if you authorized treating physician has held you out of work completely due to your injury or has placed work restrictions on you that your employer is unable to accommodate, you may be entitled to Temporary Total Disability (TTD). If you have returned to work, but are making less than you were making before you were injured you may be entitled to Temporary Partial Disability (TPD) income benefits.

In Georgia, injured workers are entitled to receive income benefits for a maximum of 400 weeks unless their case has been determined to be “catastrophic.”The rules covering your entitlement to TTD and TPD are complex. Click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

If you meet the requirements for Temporary Total Disability (TTD) as defined in Georgia’s Workers’ Compensation statute, your TTD is computed by taking 2/3 of your Average Weekly Wage (AWW), not to exceed a maximum amount permitted by statute.AWW is computed using your gross weekly income from the 13 months immediately prior to your date of injury.For workers injured on or after, July 1, 2016, the maximum weekly TTD amount is $575.00 per week.

If you are entitled to Temporary Partial Disability (TPD) your TPD will be calculated as 2/3’s of the difference between what you are presently making and what you were making before you were injured.As of July 1, 2016, the maximum weekly TPD benefit is $383.00 per week.

This area of the law can be quite complicated.To learn more about you income benefits, click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

As a general rule, you are entitled to receive medical treatment for your on the job accident at no cost to you. Similar to income benefits, in Georgia, injured workers are entitled to receive medical benefits for a maximum of 400 weeks unless their case has been determined to be “catastrophic.” The rules covering your entitlement to medical benefits are complex. Click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.

Yes and No. In exchange for receiving medical care paid by your employer, you are restricted to treating with a doctor “pre-selected” by your employer. As a general rule, you are required to select a doctor from the employers “Panel of Physicians” which is required to be posted in your place of work.If this panel of physicians does not exist or was not properly posted, you MAY be able to select a doctor of your choice. This area of the law can be quite complicated. To learn more about whether you can choose your own doctor, click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney BEFORE you select your doctor.

Yes. Employers and their Insurers can deny payment of any portion of your claim. If your Workers’ Compensation claim has denied, you need to you consult with an attorney IMMEDIATELY to learn how to contest the denial. We have been representing injured workers for over 20+ years. Click here or call us at (229) 520-5073 to schedule your free consultation with a workers’ compensation attorney.